Where Social Networking is Reachless and Educationally Inadequate

Dr. Charles Mitchell
Language
English

Where Social Networking is Reachless and Educationally Inadequate

When those supportive of social networking's potential fail as their ideas confront those bitterly pessimistic about this Internet phenomenon, conflict may occur. This paper analyzes the implications of cultural conflict and social networking. Outlier freedom of speech values in the U.S. have produced more belief in social networking than has happened in most countries. Other liberal democracies have deliberately chosen a different course in free speech and curled ideas about social networking differently. Reachless and educationally inadequate problems occur in social networking because of this conflict in cognitive cultures. Belief in substantial freedom of speech appears correlated with strong beliefs in personal privacy. Analyzed as canto theory, questions occur about peace or conflict beyond the present time. Subsequent cantos could be substantially affected by conflicts in cognitive culture provoked by social networking.

Data for better analyzing social networking’s potential for failure is found in narrative created from images positive and negative toward the effects of social networking. This data proves unusually valuable from the perspective of qualitative methods for analyzing chaotic possibilities. Concepts about the conflict between those favorable and unfavorable to social networking develop. Concern with multitasking, depression, addiction, and relationship problems develop important analytic concepts. Issues about whether social networking involuntarily manipulates human behavior playing upon innate social needs are recognized. The psychological issues raised by social networking cause questioning about how present day use of technology effects future eras. Reference is made throughout the paper to an Internet personality with a 312K Instagram following. Future research from the canto theoretical perspective could research futurology implications of social networking.

Personality models including the five factors model and the negotiating identity model amplify data analysis conclusions. Social networking likely causes substantial tension in personality models as agility and adaptation lose while agreement and conformity gain approval. Cultural differences create different approaches to identity negotiation. Where free speech is a preferred right, people place more trust and belief in social networking. Conflicts with cultures having alternative ideas about free speech are inevitable. Future eras may look derisively at social networking because of conflicts this phenomenon produces.