The Power of Rationality vs. the Strength of Relationality: Which One Rules in Chinese Foreign Policy?

Panel Code
GS03.51
Language
English

The current IR literatures analyzing the rising China emphasize more the rational calculation and parallel Beijing’s behaviors with the Western great powers. This panel brings in the angle of relationalism of IR and applies the source from the Chinese School of IR to create a platform for debating whether rationality or relationality rules the domain of Chinese foreign policy. By providing multiple case studies and covering both China’s policy toward the neighboring countries and its participation in global governance, this panel is meant to decode the specific way China appropriate its power and the underlying the rationale it perceive the outside world. Besides, what further features this panel is the research perspective provided by a group of young experts of Chinese foreign policy from Taiwan. We assume the perspective from the weak in an asymmetric power structure shall be more critical while in the same time more introspective toward the current studies of IR and the research of contemporary China.

The impacts of China’s Rise are not only limited in policy realms such as regional security and stability. In-depth studies of these impacts lead us to reflect on the specific way China appropriate its power and the underlying rationale it perceive the outside world. This panel, featured young experts of Chinese foreign policy from Taiwan, consists of cross-level analysis of theory and practice of Chinese diplomacy with a common interest of reflections on generally accepted perspectives and approaches in the field. By introducing cases and revisiting core IR concepts, the panel expects to inspire new insights on Chinese foreign “relations” with a diverse view of the legendary realist concept: rationality.